Custom Authenticator and Login Module

improve this page | report issue

Overview

This tutorial describes how to create a custom authenticator and a login module, and define a realm. More specifically, you learn:

  • How to implement a custom authenticator that collects the username and password by using a request to a predefined URL.
  • How to implement a custom login module that checks credentials that are received from the authenticator.
  • How to define a realm that uses your custom authenticator and login module.
  • How to use this realm to protect resources.

This tutorial covers the following topics:

Introduction

The authentication process can be interactive (for example, based on a username and password), or non-interactive (for example, header-based authentication).
This process can involve a single step (a simple user name/password form) or multiple steps (it might have to add a challenge after it issued the first password).

An authentication realm includes the class name of an authenticator and a reference to a login module.

  • An authenticator is an entity that collects user information, such as a login form.
  • A login module is a server entity that validates the retrieved user credentials and builds the user identity.

Authentication settings such as realms, authenticators, and login modules are configured in the authenticationConfig.xml file that is generated for every MobileFirst project.

missing_alt

The authenticator, login module, and user identity instances are stored in a session scope. Therefore they exist as long as the session is alive.

You can write custom login modules and authenticators when the ones that are provided by default do not match your requirements.
In previous tutorials, form-based authentication was implemented in the form of a non-validating login module. Adapter-based authentication was also implemented without the developer having to add login modules, and credentials were valided manually.

In some cases, though, when credentials validation cannot be run at the adapter level and requires more complex code, you can implement an extra login module.
For example: When credentials validation must be customized for a specific enterprise, or when more information must be retrieved from each client request, such as cookie, header, or user-agent.

Configuring the authenticationConfig.xml file

  1. In the realms section of the authenticationConfig.xml file, define a realm called CustomAuthenticatorRealm.
  2. Make sure that it uses CustomLoginModule.
  3. Specify MyCustomAuthenticator as the name of the class, which you implement later.

    <realm name="CustomAuthenticatorRealm" loginModule="CustomLoginModule">
        <className>com.mypackage.MyCustomAuthenticator</className>
    </realm>

  4. In the loginModules section, add a loginModule instance called CustomLoginModule.
  5. Specify MyCustomLoginModule as the class name, which you implement later.

    <loginModule name="CustomLoginModule">
        <className>com.mypackage.MyCustomLoginModule</className>
    </loginModule>

  6. In the securityTests section, add a security test.
    Later, you use this security test to protect a JavaScript adapter. Therefore, use a customSecurityTest element and remember the security test name.
    Note: If you use Java adapters, this step is not required.

    <customSecurityTest name="DummyAdapter-securityTest">
        <test isInternalUserID="true" realm="CustomAuthenticatorRealm" />
    </customSecurityTest>
     

Creating a custom Java authenticator

API overview

The WorkLightAuthenticator API includes the following methods:

  • The init method is called when the authenticator instance is created. It takes the parameters that are specified in the definition of the realm in the authenticationConfig.xml file.
    void init(Map<String, String> options)
  • The processRequest method is called for each request from an unauthenticated session.
    AuthenticationResult processRequest(HttpServletRequest request, HttpServletResponse response, boolean isAccessToProtectedResource)
  • The processAuthenticationFailure method is called if the login module returns a failure of credentials validation.
    AuthenticationResult processAuthenticationFailure(HttpServletRequest request, HttpServletResponse response, String errorMessage)
  • The processRequestAlreadyAuthenticated method is called for each request from an already authenticated session.
    AuthenticationResult processRequestAlreadyAuthenticated(HttpServletRequest request, HttpServletResponse response)
    Important: When using the new OAuth flow, this method will not be called as long as the access token is valid.
  • The getAuthenticationData method is used by a login module to get the credentials that are collected by an authenticator.
    Map<String, Object> getAuthenticationData()
  • The changeResponseOnSuccess method is called after authentication success. It is used to add data to the response after authentication is successful.
    Boolean changeResponseOnSuccess (HttpServletRequest request, HttpServletResponse response)
  • The clone method is used to create a deep copy of class members.
    WorkLightAuthenticator clone()

Walkthrough

  1. Create a MyCustomAuthenticator class in the server\java folder
    Make sure that this class implements the WorkLightAuthenticator interface.

    public class MyCustomAuthenticator implements WorkLightAuthenticator{

    The WorkLightAuthenticator interface extends the java.io.Serializable interface, and therefore so does the custom authenticator. This means that the custom authenticator should not have any nonserializable fields. Moreover, it is recommended to include a serialVersionUID value in accordance to the java.io.Serializable documentation.

  2. Add the credentials fields to your authenticator to hold the credentials information.
    These objects will be filled to the authentication data map in getAuthenticationData() and used by a login module.

    private String username;
    private String password;
  3. Add a dependency on the server runtime libraries to use server-related classes, for example, HttpServletRequest.
    1. Right-click your MobileFirst project and select Properties.
    2. Select Java Build Path → Libraries and click Add Library.
    3. Select Server Runtime and click Next.
      You see a list of server runtimes that are installed in your Eclipse IDE.
    4. Select one and click Finish.
    5. Click OK.
  4. Add calls to the following methods as appropriate.
    • The init method is called when the authenticator is created. As its parameter, this method takes the map of options that is specified in a realm definition in the authenticationConfig.xml file.

      public void init(Map<String, String> options) throws MissingConfigurationOptionException {
          logger.info("MyCustomAuthenticator initialized");
      }
    • The clone method of the authenticator creates a deep copy of the object members.

      public WorkLightAuthenticator clone() throws CloneNotSupportedException {
          MyCustomAuthenticator otherAuthenticator = (MyCustomAuthenticator) super.clone();
          return otherAuthenticator;
      }
    • The processRequest method is called for each unauthenticated request to collect credentials.

      public AuthenticationResult processRequest(HttpServletRequest request, HttpServletResponse response, boolean isAccessToProtectedResource) throws IOException,	ServletException {
          if (request.getRequestURI().contains("my_custom_auth_request_url")) {
              String username = request.getParameter("username");
              String password = request.getParameter("password");
              if (null != username && null != password && username.length() > 0 && password.length() > 0) {
                  this.username = request.getParameter("username");
      	    this.password = request.getParameter("password");
                  return AuthenticationResult.createFrom(AuthenticationStatus.SUCCESS);
              } else {
                  response.setContentType("application/json; charset=UTF-8");
                  response.setHeader("Cache-Control", "no-cache, must-revalidate");
                  response.getWriter().print("{\"authStatus\":\"required\", \"errorMessage\":\"Please enter username and password\"}");
                  return AuthenticationResult.createFrom(AuthenticationStatus.CLIENT_INTERACTION_REQUIRED);
              }
          }
          if (!isAccessToProtectedResource)
              return AuthenticationResult.createFrom(AuthenticationStatus.REQUEST_NOT_RECOGNIZED);
          response.setContentType("application/json; charset=UTF-8");
          response.setHeader("Cache-Control", "no-cache, must-revalidate");
          response.getWriter().print("{\"authStatus\":\"required\"}");
          return AuthenticationResult.createFrom(AuthenticationStatus.CLIENT_INTERACTION_REQUIRED);
      }

      The processRequest() method takes the request, response, and isAccessToProtectedResource arguments. The method can retrieve data from a request and write data to a response, and must return a specific AuthenticationResult status as described later.
      Reminder: The authenticator collects the credentials for a login module; it does not validate them.

      public AuthenticationResult processRequest(HttpServletRequest request, HttpServletResponse response, boolean isAccessToProtectedResource) throws IOException, ServletException {

      The application sends an authentication request to a specific URL. This request URL contains a my_custom_auth_request_url component, which is used by the authenticator to verify whether this request is an authentication request. It is recommended to have a different URL component in each authenticator.

      if (request.getRequestURI().contains("my_custom_auth_request_url")){

      The authenticator retrieves the username and password that are passed as request parameters.

      this.username = request.getParameter("username");
      this.password = request.getParameter("password");

      The authenticator checks the credentials for basic validity, creates an authenticationData object, and returns SUCCESS.
      The SUCCESS return value means only that the credentials were successfully collected; after that, the login module is called to validate the credentials.

      if (null != username && null != password && username.length() > 0 && password.length() > 0){
          return AuthenticationResult.createFrom(AuthenticationStatus.SUCCESS);
      }

      If a problem occurs with the received credentials, the authenticator adds an error message to the response and returns CLIENT_INTERACTION_REQUIRED. The client must still supply authentication data.

      else {
          response.setContentType("application/json; charset=UTF-8");
          response.setHeader("Cache-Control", "no-cache, must-revalidate");
          response.getWriter().print("{\"authStatus\":\"required\", \"errorMessage\":\"Please enter username and password\"}");
          return AuthenticationResult.createFrom(AuthenticationStatus.CLIENT_INTERACTION_REQUIRED);
      }

      The isAccessToProtectedResource argument specifies whether an access attempt was made to a protected resource.
      If not, the method returns REQUEST_NOT_RECOGNIZED, which means that the authenticator treatment is not required, and can proceed with the request as is.

      if (!isAccessToProtectedResource)
          return AuthenticationResult.createFrom(AuthenticationStatus.REQUEST_NOT_RECOGNIZED);

      If the request made to a protected resource does not contain authentication data, the authenticator adds an authStatus:required property to the response, and also returns a CLIENT_INTERACTION_REQUIRED status.

      response.setContentType("application/json; charset=UTF-8");
      response.setHeader("Cache-Control", "no-cache, must-revalidate");
      response.getWriter().print("{\"authStatus\":\"required\"}");
      return AuthenticationResult.createFrom(AuthenticationStatus.CLIENT_INTERACTION_REQUIRED);
    • The authenticator getAuthenticationData method is used by a login module to get collected credentials.
      After the authenticated session is established, all requests are transported through the changeResponseOnSuccess and processRequestAlreadyAuthenticated methods. You can use these methods to retrieve data from requests and to update responses.

      public Map<String, Object> getAuthenticationData() {
          logger.info("getAuthenticationData");
          Map<String, Object> authenticationData = new HashMap<String, Object>();
          authenticationData.put("username", username);
          authenticationData.put("password", password);
          return authenticationData;
      }
    • The changeResponseOnSuccess method is called after credentials are successfully validated by the login module. You can use this method to modify the response before you return it to the client. This method must return true if the response was modified. Otherwise, it returns false.
      Use it to notify a client application about the authentication success.

      public boolean changeResponseOnSuccess(HttpServletRequest request, HttpServletResponse response) throws IOException {
          if (request.getRequestURI().contains("my_custom_auth_request_url")){
              response.setContentType("application/json; charset=UTF-8");
              response.setHeader("Cache-Control", "no-cache, must-revalidate");
              response.getWriter().print("{\"authStatus\":\"complete\"}");
              return true;
          }
          return false;
      }
    • The processRequestAlreadyAuthenticated method returns AuthenticationResult objects for authenticated requests.

      public AuthenticationResult processRequestAlreadyAuthenticated(HttpServletRequest request, HttpServletResponse response) throws IOException, ServletException {
          return AuthenticationResult.createFrom(AuthenticationStatus.REQUEST_NOT_RECOGNIZED);
      }
    • If the login module returns an authentication failure, the processAuthenticationFailure method is called. This method writes an error message to a response body, and returns the CLIENT_INTERACTION_REQUIRED status.

      public AuthenticationResult processAuthenticationFailure(HttpServletRequest request, HttpServletResponse response,
              String errorMessage) throws IOException, ServletException {
          response.setContentType("application/json; charset=UTF-8");
          response.setHeader("Cache-Control", "no-cache, must-revalidate");
          response.getWriter().print("{\"authStatus\":\"required\", \"errorMessage\":\"" + errorMessage + "\"}");
          return AuthenticationResult.createFrom(AuthenticationStatus.CLIENT_INTERACTION_REQUIRED);
      }

Creating a custom Java login module

API overview

The WorkLightAuthLoginModule API includes the following methods:

  • The init method of the login module is called when the login module instance is created. This method takes the options that are specified in the login module definition of the authenticationConfig.xml file.

    void init(Map<String, String> options)
  • The login method of the login module is used to validate the credentials that are collected by the authenticator.

    boolean login(Map<String, Object> authenticationData)
  • The createIdentity method of the login module is used to create a userIdentity object after validation of the credentials succeeds.

    UserIdentity createIdentity(String loginModule)
  • The logout and abort methods are used to clean up cached data after a logout or authentication aborts.

    void logout()
    void abort()
  • The clone method is used to create a deep copy of the class members.
    WorkLightLoginModule clone()

Walkthrough

  1. Create a MyCustomLoginModule class in the server\java folder.
  2. Make sure that this class implements the WorkLightAuthLoginModule interface.

    public class MyCustomLoginModule implements WorkLightAuthLoginModule {

    The WorkLightAuthLoginModule interface extends the java.io.Serializable interface, and therefore so does your custom login module. This means that it should not have any nonserializable fields. Moreover, it is recommended to include a serialVersionUID value in accordance to java.io.Serializable documentation.

  3. Add two private class members, USERNAME and PASSWORD, to hold the user credentials.

    private String USERNAME;
    private String PASSWORD;

  4. Add calls to the following methods as appropriate.
    • The init method is called when the login module instance is created. As its parameter, it takes the map of options that are specified in a login module definition in the authenticationConfig.xml file.

       <br />
      public void init(Map<String, String> options) throws MissingConfigurationOptionException {<br />
      }<br />
       
    • The clone method of the login module creates a deep copy of the object members.

      public MyCustomLoginModule clone() throws CloneNotSupportedException {
          return (MyCustomLoginModule) super.clone();
      }
    • The login method is called after the authenticator returns the SUCCESS status.
      When called, the login method gets an authenticationData object from the authenticator.
      The login method retrieves the username and password that the authenticator previously stored.

      In this example, the login module validates the credentials against hardcoded values. You can implement your own validation rules.

      • If the credentials are valid, the login method returns true.
      • If validation fails, the login method can either return false or throw a RuntimeException exception. The exception string is returned to the authenticator as an errorMessage parameter.

        public boolean login(Map<String, Object> authenticationData) {
            USERNAME = (String) authenticationData.get("username");
            PASSWORD = (String) authenticationData.get("password");
           if (USERNAME.equals("user") && PASSWORD.equals("12345"))
                return true;
            else
                throw new RuntimeException("Invalid credentials");
        }
         
    • The createIdentity method is called when the login method returns true. It is used to create a UserIdentity object. You can store your own custom attributes in it to use them later in Java or adapter code.

      public UserIdentity createIdentity(String loginModule) {
          HashMap<String, Object> customAttributes = new HashMap<String, Object>();
          customAttributes.put("AuthenticationDate", new Date());
          UserIdentity identity = new UserIdentity(loginModule, USERNAME, null, null, customAttributes, PASSWORD);
          return identity;
      }

      The UserIdentity object contains user information. Its constructor is:

      public UserIdentity(String loginModule,
              String name,
              String displayName,
              Set<String> roles,
              Map<String, Object> attributes,
              Object credentials)
    • The logout and abort methods are used to clean up class members after the user logs out or aborts the authentication flow.

      public void logout() {
          USERNAME = null;
          PASSWORD = null;
      }
      
      public void abort() {
          USERNAME = null;
          PASSWORD = null;
      }

Protecting a JavaScript adapter

  1. Create an adapter and name it DummyAdapter.
  2. Add a getSecretData procedure and protect it with the security test that you created when you configured the authenticationConfig.xml file.

     <procedure name="getSecretData" securityTest="DummyAdapter-securityTest"/> 

    In this module, the getSecretData procedure returns some hardcoded value:

    function getSecretData(){
        return {
            secretData: '123456'
        };
    }

Protecting a Java adapter

  1. Create a Java adapter.
  2. Add a getSecretData method and protect it with the realm that you created when you configured the authenticationConfig.xml file.
    In this module, the getSecretData procedure returns some hardcoded value:

    	@GET
    	@Produces("application/json")
    	@OAuthSecurity(scope="CustomAuthenticatorRealm")
    	public JSONObject getSecretData(){
    		JSONObject result = new JSONObject();
    		result.put("secretData", "123456");
    		return result;
    	}
  3. To set the new realm as the default user identity for the application, in the application descriptor, add this option:
    <userIdentityRealms>CustomAuthenticatorRealm</userIdentityRealms>

To learn more about application descriptor properties, see the user documentation.

Known limitation: If you use Java adapters, the client-side logout feature is not currently supported and may lead to unexpected behavior.

Related content: Blog post on Custom Authenticators and Login Modules

Creating the client-side authentication components

Last modified on November 09, 2016