Implementing the UserAuthenticationSecurityCheck Class

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Overview

This abstract class extends CredentialsValidationSecurityCheck and builds upon it to fit the most common use-cases of simple user authentication. In addition to validating the credentials, it creates a user identity that is accessible from various parts of the framework, allowing you to identify the current user. Optionally, UserAuthenticationSecurityCheck also provides Remember Me capabilities.

This tutorial uses the example of a security check that asks for a user name and password, and uses the user name to represent an authenticated user.

Prerequisites: Make sure to read the CredentialsValidationSecurityCheck tutorial.

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Creating the Security Check

Create a Java adapter and add a Java class named UserLogin that extends UserAuthenticationSecurityCheck.

public class UserLogin extends UserAuthenticationSecurityCheck {

    @Override
    protected AuthenticatedUser createUser() {
        return null;
    }

    @Override
    protected boolean validateCredentials(Map<String, Object> credentials) {
        return false;
    }

    @Override
    protected Map<String, Object> createChallenge() {
        return null;
    }
}

Creating the challenge

The challenge is exactly the same as the one described in Implementing the CredentialsValidationSecurityCheck.

@Override
protected Map<String, Object> createChallenge() {
    Map challenge = new HashMap();
    challenge.put("errorMsg",errorMsg);
    challenge.put("remainingAttempts",getRemainingAttempts());
    return challenge;
}

Validating the user credentials

When the client sends the challenge answer, the answer is passed to validateCredentials as a Map. Use this method to implement your logic. The method returns true if the credentials are valid.

In this example, credentials are considered “valid” whenusername and password are the same:

@Override
protected boolean validateCredentials(Map<String, Object> credentials) {
    if(credentials!=null && credentials.containsKey("username") && credentials.containsKey("password")){
        String username = credentials.get("username").toString();
        String password = credentials.get("password").toString();
        if(!username.isEmpty() && !password.isEmpty() && username.equals(password)) {
            return true;
        }
        else {
            errorMsg = "Wrong Credentials";
        }
    }
    else{
        errorMsg = "Credentials not set properly";
    }
    return false;
}

Creating the AuthenticatedUser object

The UserAuthenticationSecurityCheck class stores a representation of the current client (user, device, application) in persistent data, allowing you to retrieve the current user in various parts of your code, such as the challenge handlers or the adapters. Users are represented by an instance of the class AuthenticatedUser. Its constructor takes the id, displayName, and securityCheckName parameters.

This example uses username for both the id and displayName parameters.

  1. First, modify the validateCredentials method to save the username argument:

    private String userId, displayName;
    
    @Override
    protected boolean validateCredentials(Map<String, Object> credentials) {
         if(credentials!=null && credentials.containsKey("username") && credentials.containsKey("password")){
             String username = credentials.get("username").toString();
             String password = credentials.get("password").toString();
             if(!username.isEmpty() && !password.isEmpty() && username.equals(password)) {
                 userId = username;
                 displayName = username;
                 return true;
             }
             else {
                 errorMsg = "Wrong Credentials";
             }
         }
         else{
             errorMsg = "The credentials are not set properly.";
         }
         return false;
    }
    
  2. Then, override the createUser method to return a new instance of AuthenticatedUser:

    @Override
    protected AuthenticatedUser createUser() {
         return new AuthenticatedUser(userId, displayName, this.getName());
    }
    

You can use this.getName() to get the current security check name.

UserAuthenticationSecurityCheck calls your createUser() implementation after a successful validateCredentials.

Storing attributes in the AuthenticatedUser

AuthenticatedUser has an alternate constructor:

AuthenticatedUser(String id, String displayName, String securityCheckName, Map<String, Object> attributes);

This constructor adds a Map of custom attributes to be stored with the user representation. The map can be used to store additional information such as a profile picture, a website, etc. This information is accessible to the client side (challenge handler) and the resource (using introspection data).

Note: The attributes Map must contain only objects of types/classes bundled in the Java library (such as String, int, Map, etc), and not custom classes.

Adding RememberMe functionality

By default, UserAuthenticationSecurityCheck uses the successStateExpirationSec property to determine how long the success state lasts. This property is inherited from CredentialsValidationSecurityCheck.

If you want to allow users to stay logged-in past the successStateExpirationSec value, UserAuthenticationSecurityCheck adds this capability.

UserAuthenticationSecurityCheck adds a property called rememberMeDurationSec whose default value is 0: by default, users are remembered for 0 seconds, which means that by default, the feature is disabled. Change this value to a number that makes sense for your application (a day, a week, a month…).

You can also manage the feature by overriding the rememberCreatedUser() method, which returns true by default, meaning that the feature is active by default (provided that you changed the duration property).

In this example, the client decides to enable/disable the RememberMe feature by sending a boolean value as part of the submitted credentials.

  1. First, modify the validateCredentials method to save the rememberMe choice:

    private String userId, displayName;
    private boolean rememberMe = false;
    
    @Override
    protected boolean validateCredentials(Map<String, Object> credentials) {
         if(credentials!=null && credentials.containsKey("username") && credentials.containsKey("password")){
             String username = credentials.get("username").toString();
             String password = credentials.get("password").toString();
             if(!username.isEmpty() && !password.isEmpty() && username.equals(password)) {
                 userId = username;
                 displayName = username;
    
                 //Optional RememberMe
                 if(credentials.containsKey("rememberMe") ){
                     rememberMe = Boolean.valueOf(credentials.get("rememberMe").toString());
                 }
    
                 return true;
             }
             else {
                 errorMsg = "Wrong Credentials";
             }
         }
         else{
             errorMsg = "Credentials not set properly";
         }
         return false;
    }
    
  2. Then, override the rememberCreatedUser() method:

    @Override
    protected boolean rememberCreatedUser() {
         return rememberMe;
    }
    

Configuring the security check

In the adapter.xml file, add a <securityCheckDefinition> element:

<securityCheckDefinition name="UserLogin" class="com.sample.UserLogin">
  <property name="maxAttempts" defaultValue="3" description="How many attempts are allowed."/>
  <property name="blockedStateExpirationSec" defaultValue="10" description="How long before the client can try again (seconds)."/>
  <property name="successStateExpirationSec" defaultValue="60" description="How long is a successful state valid for (seconds)."/>
  <property name="rememberMeDurationSec" defaultValue="120" description="How long is the user remembered by the RememberMe feature (seconds)."/>
</securityCheckDefinition>

As mentioned previously, UserAuthenticationSecurityCheck inherits all the CredentialsValidationSecurityCheck properties, such as blockedStateExpirationSec, successStateExpirationSec, etc.

In addition, you can also configure a rememberMeDurationSec property.

Sample Security Check

Download the Security Checks Maven project.

The Maven project contains an implementation of UserAuthenticationSecurityCheck.

Last modified on January 30, 2017